How a diva cup took me to the moon

A few months ago while at a work conference in Ohio, I was having a conversation with my colleague, Jacqueline Nye, and she mentioned how annoyed she was that she forgot her diva cup.

Diva cup?

Images of a gold encrusted pink pimp cup with the word “DIVA” carved out in gold lettering popped in my head.

As it turns out, a “diva cup” is a small silicone cup inserted in the vagina to collect menstrual blood. After that conversation, I did some Googling and found that women are using more sustainable ways to “period.”

It seems that although sanitary napkins, known as “pads” in the streets, and tampons are quite popular they are not the best option for women or this gorgeous planet that God has blessed us with. To find out why sanitary napkins and tampons are so yesterday, visit: http://sustainablecycles.org/sustainable-menstrual-products/ and http://sustainablecycles.org/menstrual-cup-basics/ but make sure you come back and finish reading my post!

After more googling and a Facebook post about sustainable periods, I was sold! Yes, I post stuff like that on Facebook. Why? Because periods happen, dude, and it’s not something that should be hidden under a dark cloudy sheet. We should communicate comfortably about period products in the same way that we discuss makeup removers.

Anyway! I learned about Mooncups which are much like diva cups, and I also stumbled upon information about cloth pads. There’s a demographic of women who have ditched the silly ways of sanitary napkins and tampons because…

over 13 billion pads and 7 million tampons are used and disposed of every year! (Tree Hugger Cloth Pads)

I’m all about trying to do my little bit to conserve this planet so I paid $30 for my Mooncup and $35.89 for a shipment of four cloth pads from Tree Hugger Cloth Pads. Both products will last several years before needing to be replaced.

What is it like to use a Mooncup for the first time?
Frankly, it’s kind of like the first time you put anything foreign in your vagina. I was like oh, this feels weird. Huh. Not bad. Once I stopped focussing on the fact that I had a tiny cup inside of me, I didn’t even feel the thing in there! 100 times better than any tampon I’ve ever used including those tiny compact ones from Kotex that are better for the environment than the ones with a plastic applicator.

How do I get it out?
Okay! This part was scary. The Mooncup has this little stem that sticks out like a tampon string would. Well, I just pulled on the thing. Lord! I thought my vagina was going to come out with the cup. Little did I know, the Mooncup functions with awesome suction power. Don’t just yank it or your vagina will be hella pissed. (Ha! Vagina. Hella pissed.) Here’s what you do… squat over your toiled seat, like you would to take a tampon out and squeeze that bad boy out using those vagina muscles. While doing your kegels, use two fingers, one on each side, and squeeze the bottom of the cup. It’ll start to slide out, then and only then do I recommend pulling the stem. Most of the time, I just take it out directly from the sides without using the stem. I credit this section to my future cousin-in-law Tiffany Freeman, if it were not for her advice I wouldn’t know how to kegel my Mooncup out.

What do I do with it once I get it out?
Just dump the bloody contents out in the toilet. It was a cool experience to actually see my period blood in all its glory for the first time. I thought I’d be grossed out but instead, I felt so close to my body. But, enough with the sentiments. Flush the blood, wash the cup and put that sucker back in. ALWAYS WASH YOUR HANDS BEFORE YOU PUT THE CUP IN AND AFTER YOU TAKE IT OUT, unless you’re into getting infections.

Should I use soap?
I just use water until it’s clean.

What about leakage?
I didn’t experience any. But! I did put on one of my Tree Huggers just in case.

Tell me more about them Tree Huggers, girl…
They are like any pad except they are made with water-resistant fleece and are re-usable. There’s no smell and it feels like I’m sitting on soft carpet all day. They soak up an unbelievable amount. I would recommend having two large overnight ones, and two regular ones–for sure. There are also pantyliner sizes. After use, I put it in my bathroom sink and turnon the hot water, then I squeeze all the blood out until the water is clean. Afterwards, I use some soap to do a pre-wash and hang up in my shower. Once dry, I throw them in my hamper. During the day, I carry a leather pouch I once used as my sanitary napkin and tampon carrier to keep clean cloth pads and to store dirty ones. The brand I have come with a snap, I ordered mine with a second snap which makes for a snug fit.

What I learned about periods after using the Mooncup and Tree Hugger:

  • Our periods don’t smell. That bad period smell comes from using a tampon or sanity napkin, because they do not allow our vagina to breathe. I didn’t experience any of my typical period smell using these sustainable alternatives.
  • Our periods are not gross. It is a natural process that women undergo; embrace it, love it.
  • Sharing with other women and asking them questions makes the process of transitioning to sustainable menstrual items easier. There’s tons of information available on disposable period materials like sanitary napkins and tampons, but very little about sustainable alternatives, so share what you know.
  • Try using a Mooncup, Diva Cup and/or cloth pads before you decide sustainable methods are not for you. I know it may sound gross at first, but just give it a try the next time Mother Nature comes knocking.

I’m here for questions and things, please don’t hesitate to ask below or e-mail me at letitflose@gmail.com. I look forward to having you join me on the moon next month 😉

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