Dear Dr. King, your legacy is the source of our revival

The other night i watched our first black president address his nation for the last time

like you, he spoke to millions of faces — white and black faces that just seemed to blend together

through the glowing screen i watched your dream personified

his optimism echoed your message, Dr. King, but in the wake of November 8th i found myself angry, scared, defeated

and in that moment Barack was not enough

in that moment your dream was not enough

and so i began to sing

my country tis of thee, 

sweet land of liberty,

of thee i sing; 

land where my fathers died;

land of the pilgrim’s pride;

from every mountain side 

let freedom ring! 

i am reminded that— we are not free until all Americans can walk in equality

though unshackled and legs moving

we are anchored to a rock

a rock of injustice, racism, fear, intolerance

a rock colored red white and blue

when guns melt black bodies to tarred streets

I say let freedom ring! —-red white and blue

when the soil drains justice, peace, love and decency from the very fabric that stitches the American people together as one

I say let freedom ring! —-red white and blue

when the rock solidifies hatred from every nook and cranny of our government

I say let freedom ring! —-red white and blue

red white and blue

i want to let freedom ring but i often see only, you — red white and blue

but freedom we often forget

freedom we often forget until about this time of year when we honor your words, Dr. King

this is the time of year when your presence illuminates every news channel, choirs sing aloud, parents pull theirs kids up on eager laps and tell your story

we tell a story of a heroic man who towered over injustice

a man who proclaimed words from a wellspring of love and wisdom

a man who knew his legacy would inspire 365 days a year

but lately, in the face of overt hatred and bigotry we have reverted to a hopelessness

some might say it happened after your dream was realized through Obama

others might say it was never realized because you still had much to do

whatever it may be we’ve come to a place where the weight of struggle has become a heavy burden again

but even as i write this i remember your very words

“we must continue to struggle through legalism and legislation” 

it was not an easy road that brought us here, and it is not an easy road that will take us to freedom

but freedom does not ring without fight

not a fight that calls for retaliation or burning what is left of red white and blue

but one that calls for unity and courage

today and everyday, Dr. King, you remind us that the arc of the moral universe is long but it bends toward justice 

everyday we need to act justly and move toward the light

our journey has to start small, right here in our backyards

i am reminded that before your assassination you moved to yet another grassroots effort — Dr. King, you found your way to Memphis and worked with sanitation workers

so, even in the face of major national losses, we have got to fight for justice within our neighborhoods —  here — in Delray

we have to choose between right and wrong right here in our community

that’s how the fight for justice prevails

Dr. King, you taught us that oppressed people cannot remain oppressed forever. the urge for freedom will eventually come. 

we, the American people will not idle in a castle awaiting another civil rights knight to save us. we will have to take action. we will have to turn our anger, sadness, and defeat into freedom for every single American so that your legacy can truly live on each and every day

Written by Flose Boursiquot, author of Close Your Eyes, Now Breathe 

*This original poem was written for Spady Museum’s 17th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Breakfast and later appeared in the February 2017 issue of the Delray Newspaper.*

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Ineye: Her Afro is a Crown of Knowledge and Unity

Ineye Komonibo & Friends

There she is, Ineye Komonibo (pronounces in-NAY-yay), a gorgeous carefree woman. She is standing on the far right in this image with two of her college roommates. All three women wear their hair out in huge afros, are dressed beautifully, and wear accomplishment on their shoulders with the same strength that they carry their black skin.

This image is floating in the virtual Twitter world with over 11 thousand likes and eight thousand retweets. Under it, the caption “the carefree black longhorn grads who ‘stole’ your admission #StayMadAbby.”

Thieves. How could these three women be thieves.

“I posted the picture [with that caption] because it was amazing to hear someone say that black students—not Latino, Asian, White—but that black students are not capable”

That someone, Abigail Fisher, the young woman who does not want race to be considered in college admissions, because her sub-par academics didn’t get her into the University of Texas over black students.

“It’s a form of psychological terrorism to tell black students that they are not enough.”

Terrorism. That’s a big word. Ineye is not shy to use it, because the way she sees it, the American education system is “fundamentally anti-black and black people constantly have to prove themselves.” Every single day when a person of color wakes up, they walk the streets in a society that “does damage to their psychy.”

Abigail Fisher is not an anomoly, she is a small part of a larger system that Ineye believes in anti-black.

Unfortunately, Ineye isn’t dreaming up an anti-black world, even U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia partakes in psychological terrorism. Justice Scalia speaks the same language as Abigail Fisher. In his eyes, black students are not ready for university education at a place like the University of Texas, which is where Ineye received her undergraduate degree in Public Relations with a minor in African American Studies, they belong in “lesser universities.” You’d think this U.S. Supreme Court Justice has enough knowledge to know that America has a pretty bitter history of giving black people lesser treatment, but here he is quoted in The Guardian backsliding.

Ineye doesn’t just have a say about the serious stuff going on in American news, like Affirmative Action, she also dabbles in social media sensations. Before we get into that, I’d like y’all to get to know Ms. Ineye Komonibo some more!

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The recent University of Texas at Austin graduate is 23 years old and from Houston. Ineye describes Houston as an international community with a strong Nigerian population. She herself is Nigerian, but in the last couple of years has adopted a black radical identity.

“I’m at a very interesting place in my life where my perspective about a lot of things turned out to be wrong. Anyone familiar with Nigerian culture knows that it is patriarchal. We are socialized from a young age to see the world in a specific way,” she goes to describe her upbringing as very conservative. However, a couple of years ago, Ineye experienced a shift.

“I realized that I was black. That as a woman, my gender is something that can hinder me in society. I realized that a lot of people are oppressed.”

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Ineye describes herself as the kind of person people get tired of, not because she’s always hyped up on sugar, but because she’s very conscious of oppression and her mind is constantly at work—she’s the kind of person who is “super aware.”

“I’m Nigerian, but I am a black feminist. I’m a Christian, but I believe everyone deserves rights. My parents, sometimes, I think they get tired of hearing me talk about race and sexism.”

Earlier, I mentioned that Ineye partakes in what some would call social media hype.

About two weeks ago, Ayesha Curry sent out this tweet:

Ayesha Curry Tweet

Since then, the social media world has been afire. Some women support her modesty, while others feel that she is shaming other women for choosing to show more skin. Men, for the most part, have praised Ayesha though their reason for uplifting her may indicate more implicit thoughts about a woman’s body, sexuality, and the male gaze than we think.

What does Ineye think. Well, here’s what she shared on Twitter.

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“I’m cool with Ayesha Curry. I think she’s awesome,” she goes on to discuss that Tia Mowry is among the list of woman who have shared sentiments about modesty being sexy. What struck a chord about Mrs. Curry’s popular tweet is how she phrased it. “There was a tone like ‘I like to do this for MY man and y’all other HOES could do whatever,’ That’s fine, you have a husband. But, as a woman, it is your job to support all women.”

Those comparing Ayesha Curry and the Kardashians aren’t on the same team as Ineye, because she’s about supporting all women in the skin and life that makes them happy. Really, Ineye feels that we all should be able to live freely.

“When I think of an ideal world, I think of a place where people are allowed to be different. A world where people are encouraged to exist in the way that they are. A situation where people can exist happily. Imagine a world where everybody acknowledges that we are all different, but decides to worry about other stuff, we would become a giant machine ready to change the world.”

Keep up with Ineye on Twitter as she works for change @eyekomology.

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VICE: Fixing The System (My personal reflection)

This morning I had a weird conversation with a priest about my role as a community organizer with PACT and whether our methods of organizing are effective. He feels that we are much like “false prophets,” functioning as societal agitators who soften legislation rather than fixing the real problem, the broken family. In that conversation he called out Black Lives Matter, Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton, etc… for not doing enough. He has visible anger about living in an area of Miami Gardens where he goes to bed hearing gun shots. Visible anger after a black man was gunned down near his church and nothing was mentioned on the news. Visible anger about the fate of black men in our country. However, much of it was directed at black men for killing each other. That is also a problem, a devastating problem that angers me. But our criminal justice system is corrupt, and black men are killed by police officers before they even get a chance to be “judged” and those who are judged find themselves facing a broken criminal justice system. Eric Holder told VICE that our system is broken, that the war on drugs failed. A former Sergeant said our system is broken, that the war on drugs failed. A federal judge said our system is broken, that the war on drugs failed. Our president said the system is broken. The conversation should not be about whether we are softening laws–these laws are broken, they are biased.

There needs to be real anger about our broken legislative system. There needs to be anger about the 1.1 million fathers who may have actually committed non-violent drug crimes but are now serving 30, 40 years or life in prison. There needs to be real anger about the fact that America houses more inmates than any other country. There needs to be real anger about the correlation between young black and latino males being suspended out of school and prison sentences.

We have to fix this broken Criminal Justice System. We have to break the cycle. Yes, we need to have serious conversation about how to repair cities like Chicago and Miami Gardens where a gun has taken the place of a compassionate conversation between two black men, but we MUST fix this broken system and its backwards legislation.