Gags Don’t Belong On The Job

This is not a slight to any past or current employers, but a great piece of information I learned tonight while discussing small business with a friend who is a superwoman and starting her own company with a group of amazingly talented people. Can’t wait to share more with y’all once she’s off the ground!

Long story short, we were discussing what millennials see in employers that we appreciate and the practices we no longer wish to see. From there, we began discussing conversations that are taboo at work. For example, discussing salary and benefits with your co-workers. This is a practice employers discourage because it often leads to the forming of a union but you have every right to discuss these issues. Actually, it might help bring work issues to surface and aid your employer in practicing business more justly. If juste practices are important and your employer doesn’t practice them, that job or career is likely not a good fit for you, but idk… don’t blame me if you ruin your life.

Back to the topic at hand. A great practice is to ask yourself why certain situations are taboo in the workplace and what you can do to change them. Secrecy or gags within workplaces does not excuse the many offenses folks have committed, but I think keeping quiet has aided a lot of terrible practices including sexual harassment because employees are believed to have no power and should not be speaking out.

Furthermore, if you are in a situation where you need to be treated justly, speak to your boss, then go from there. I’m tired of hearing so many friends who were told college was the way to go, so we did, and now many of them will be in debt for life… can you imagine. Life! You work a middle class job and for the rest of your life you have to pay off loans because our society told you that you HAD to go to college to make it in America.

Now you’re at this job and they’re paying you shit money and expect you to appreciate basic ass shit employers should be doing anyway. Don’t be angry about it in secret & exhale with friends although that’s totally cool — exploding and exhaling with friends is great –, do something!

Also, this idea that employees should not talk to each other about benefits and pay is fucking silly and perpetuates a capitalist system that says there ISN’t ENOUGH TO GO AROUND SO SCRAMBLE FOR WHAT YOU CAN GET. Ugh. No!

Anyway, I’m on a tangent. Maybe because I’ve been reading up on economics too much in preparation for my 3rd quarter at SOM, but I hope this was helpful.

The Atlantic
The Atlantic

Read more:
https://www.nlrb.gov/rights-we-protect/employee-rights
https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/07/when-the-boss-says-dont-tell-your-coworkers-how-much-you-get-paid/374467/

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Ineye: Her Afro is a Crown of Knowledge and Unity

Ineye Komonibo & Friends

There she is, Ineye Komonibo (pronounces in-NAY-yay), a gorgeous carefree woman. She is standing on the far right in this image with two of her college roommates. All three women wear their hair out in huge afros, are dressed beautifully, and wear accomplishment on their shoulders with the same strength that they carry their black skin.

This image is floating in the virtual Twitter world with over 11 thousand likes and eight thousand retweets. Under it, the caption “the carefree black longhorn grads who ‘stole’ your admission #StayMadAbby.”

Thieves. How could these three women be thieves.

“I posted the picture [with that caption] because it was amazing to hear someone say that black students—not Latino, Asian, White—but that black students are not capable”

That someone, Abigail Fisher, the young woman who does not want race to be considered in college admissions, because her sub-par academics didn’t get her into the University of Texas over black students.

“It’s a form of psychological terrorism to tell black students that they are not enough.”

Terrorism. That’s a big word. Ineye is not shy to use it, because the way she sees it, the American education system is “fundamentally anti-black and black people constantly have to prove themselves.” Every single day when a person of color wakes up, they walk the streets in a society that “does damage to their psychy.”

Abigail Fisher is not an anomoly, she is a small part of a larger system that Ineye believes in anti-black.

Unfortunately, Ineye isn’t dreaming up an anti-black world, even U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia partakes in psychological terrorism. Justice Scalia speaks the same language as Abigail Fisher. In his eyes, black students are not ready for university education at a place like the University of Texas, which is where Ineye received her undergraduate degree in Public Relations with a minor in African American Studies, they belong in “lesser universities.” You’d think this U.S. Supreme Court Justice has enough knowledge to know that America has a pretty bitter history of giving black people lesser treatment, but here he is quoted in The Guardian backsliding.

Ineye doesn’t just have a say about the serious stuff going on in American news, like Affirmative Action, she also dabbles in social media sensations. Before we get into that, I’d like y’all to get to know Ms. Ineye Komonibo some more!

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The recent University of Texas at Austin graduate is 23 years old and from Houston. Ineye describes Houston as an international community with a strong Nigerian population. She herself is Nigerian, but in the last couple of years has adopted a black radical identity.

“I’m at a very interesting place in my life where my perspective about a lot of things turned out to be wrong. Anyone familiar with Nigerian culture knows that it is patriarchal. We are socialized from a young age to see the world in a specific way,” she goes to describe her upbringing as very conservative. However, a couple of years ago, Ineye experienced a shift.

“I realized that I was black. That as a woman, my gender is something that can hinder me in society. I realized that a lot of people are oppressed.”

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Ineye describes herself as the kind of person people get tired of, not because she’s always hyped up on sugar, but because she’s very conscious of oppression and her mind is constantly at work—she’s the kind of person who is “super aware.”

“I’m Nigerian, but I am a black feminist. I’m a Christian, but I believe everyone deserves rights. My parents, sometimes, I think they get tired of hearing me talk about race and sexism.”

Earlier, I mentioned that Ineye partakes in what some would call social media hype.

About two weeks ago, Ayesha Curry sent out this tweet:

Ayesha Curry Tweet

Since then, the social media world has been afire. Some women support her modesty, while others feel that she is shaming other women for choosing to show more skin. Men, for the most part, have praised Ayesha though their reason for uplifting her may indicate more implicit thoughts about a woman’s body, sexuality, and the male gaze than we think.

What does Ineye think. Well, here’s what she shared on Twitter.

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“I’m cool with Ayesha Curry. I think she’s awesome,” she goes on to discuss that Tia Mowry is among the list of woman who have shared sentiments about modesty being sexy. What struck a chord about Mrs. Curry’s popular tweet is how she phrased it. “There was a tone like ‘I like to do this for MY man and y’all other HOES could do whatever,’ That’s fine, you have a husband. But, as a woman, it is your job to support all women.”

Those comparing Ayesha Curry and the Kardashians aren’t on the same team as Ineye, because she’s about supporting all women in the skin and life that makes them happy. Really, Ineye feels that we all should be able to live freely.

“When I think of an ideal world, I think of a place where people are allowed to be different. A world where people are encouraged to exist in the way that they are. A situation where people can exist happily. Imagine a world where everybody acknowledges that we are all different, but decides to worry about other stuff, we would become a giant machine ready to change the world.”

Keep up with Ineye on Twitter as she works for change @eyekomology.

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